Get Outside, Feel Better

Elizabeth G Fagan is passionate about the natural world and its creatures. In 2015–16, she volunteered to write the monthly column “Green Talk” for the Ozaukee County News Graphic on behalf of Mequon Nature Preserve. Fagan was a professional writer for many years, including a decade during which she operated her own business. She was often the photographer for her “Green Talk” columns.

See more “Green Talk” articles

August 2015 Green Talk

Elizabeth G Fagan is passionate about the natural world and its creatures. In 2015–16, she volunteered to write the monthly column "Green Talk" for the Ozaukee County News Graphic on behalf of Mequon Nature Preserve. Fagan was a professional writer for many years, including a decade during which she operated her own business. She was often the photographer for her "Green Talk" columns. See more "Green Talk" articles Contact Elizabeth G Fagan About the Art & Artist Green Talk April 2016 Talk by Elizabeth Fagan
August 2015 Green Talk by Elizabeth Fagan

New research points to specific factors supporting the claim that being in nature is good for us, a claim that most of us already know, or at least, know intuitively. Being outdoors generally means getting exercise and becoming untethered from electronic devices that cause us to be sedentary creatures of the great indoors. Because trees and plants pull pollutants into their leaves and release fresh air, there is truth to the idea that going outside and “getting a breath of fresh air” makes us feel better.

More recently, though, one study links sunlight and its physiological by-products—including vitamin D—with everything from cancer prevention to improved sports performance to weight loss. The alarmist notion that one should never be exposed to a solitary ray of sun without sunblock has been dispelled. Refer to your health resources to find out how to welcome sunshine back into your life.

Other studies target the effects of nature on the brain. People who live in cities without access to green spaces have a higher risk for anxiety, depression, and other mental illnesses than people living outside urban centers, or even those city dwellers who do spend time in parks or other natural areas. Brain scans support the theory that people walking in nature spend less time thinking negative thoughts than those walking amid the urban jungle.

Join us on August 22 for Nature’s Play Day, a free event from 9 AM to 5 PM, at Mequon Nature Preserve at 8200 W. County Line Road, Mequon. For more information, visit us online at mequonnaturepreserve.org or call (262) 242-8055.

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