Coal Balls 1 and 2

The water is rough and wild at Lake Michigan’s Left Coast, my nickname for my beach in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin. Three– to five–foot waves are common. The Lake moves astonishingly large amounts of sand and rock up and down the shoreline, sometimes within 24 hours.

Sometimes I when I rock-hunt, something fabulous will appear right before my eyes. When I see it, I feel like I just got lucky. The first coal ball I encountered was such a rock. Since that day, I have picked up a few more.

Coal balls are concretions, often in the shape of imperfect spheres. They were formed when plant material was prevented from becoming coal because of a large amount of calcite (shells of dead marine organisms) in the surrounding environment. Calcite causes the concretions to be become stone instead.


Copyright, Disclaimer, Bibliography

Carboniferous coal ball fossil, Elizabeth Fagan, Elizabeth Fagan, Elizabeth Fagan, Elizabeth Fagan, Elizabeth Fagan, Lake Michigans Left Coast, Elizabeth G Fagan, Lake Michigans Left Coast, Elizabeth G Fagan, Lake Michigans Left Coast, Elizabeth G Fagan, Lake Michigans Left Coast, Elizabeth G Fagan, Lake Michigans Left Coast, Elizabeth G Fagan, Elizabeth Grace Fagan, Elizabeth Grace Fagan, Elizabeth Grace Fagan, Elizabeth Grace Fagan, Elizabeth Grace Fagan

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